pink ribbon | October breast cancer awareness month

Rate this article and enter to win

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month—so if you have breasts, now’s the time to start getting comfortable feeling them (if you aren’t doing so already). Whether you embrace all the healthy lifestyle recommendations to reduce your risk of breast cancer—like exercising, maintaining a healthy weight, and not smoking—or not, doing regular breast self-checks is a great idea (recommended for women ages 20 and up, but you can get into the habit earlier).

The tricky thing with cancer is that sometimes there are no symptoms. This is why it’s important to make a breast self-exam part of your monthly self-care routine. When you become familiar with how your breasts normally look and feel, you will be able to detect changes early.

informative girlHere’s how to do your monthly breast self-exam:

  1. Choose a day during the week after your period ends (this is when your breasts are least likely to be tender or swollen). Make sure to have a few minutes so you don’t have to rush through it.
  2. Examine your breasts in the mirror; first with your hands on your hips and then with your palms together over your head. In both of those positions, look for redness, soreness, rash, or swelling of the breast. Also look at your nipples for inversion and gently squeeze for discharge. As you continue to do this monthly, look for any changes in breast shape, size, or symmetry over time.
  3. Next, lie down and check for lumps. You’re going to use the pads—not the tips—of your fingers from the hand opposite your breast. Start by placing your fingers just under your collarbone. If you think of your breast as a clock, that would be 12:00. Using moderate pressure move the pads of your fingers in a circular motion, about the size of a quarter. Do this over and over, continuing in a straight line toward your nipple. Start again at the outside of your breast at 1:00, working your way toward the nipple. Do this all the way around until you cover your entire breast. Repeat with your other breast.
  4. Now you’re going to do the same check for both breasts while standing up. This check may be easier in the shower, when your skin is wet.

That’s it.

What if I feel a lump?girl with question mark

It’s important to know that most women naturally have a few lumps or lumpy areas in their breasts. These can be from hormones, benign breast conditions, or even injury.  This is why it’s so important to do this breast self-check monthly so you learn what’s normal for you and are able to notice new and different lumps.

If you feel any lumps or notice changes, don’t panic, because most breast lumps are benign. Be sure to make an appointment with your doctor or medical clinic to get it checked out. This goes for men, too. While male breast cancer is rare, it’s possible; so even though these breast self-checks are for women, you can still keep an eye out for any of these signs or symptoms in yourself.

Remember, don’t just do this in October for Breast Cancer Awareness Month—make it a monthly self-care routine.

W&L Resources
GET HELP OR FIND OUT MORE

Individuals under the age of 13 may not enter or submit information to this giveaway.
Your data will never be shared or sold to outside parties. View our Privacy Policy.

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us More
How can we get more people to read ?
? First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chance to win?

Refer up to 5 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Friends Email 1:

Friends Email 2:

Friends Email 3:

Friends Email 4:

Friends Email 5:

What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

If you could change one thing about , what would it be?

HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?
?First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

? (55 x 4) / 2 + 4 =

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chance to win?

Refer up to 5 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Friends Email 1:

Friends Email 2:

Friends Email 3:

Friends Email 4:

Friends Email 5:



HAVE YOU SEEN AT LEAST ONE THING IN THIS ISSUE THAT...

..you will apply to everyday life?

..caused you to get involved, ask for help,
utilize campus resources, or help a friend?

Tell us more.
How can we get more people to read ?

?First Name:

Last Name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chance to win?

Refer up to 5 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Friends Email 1:

Friends Email 2:

Friends Email 3:

Friends Email 4:

Friends Email 5:



Article sources

Breastcancer.org. (2019). Breast self-exam. Retrieved from https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/testing/types/self_exam

Canadian Cancer Society. (n.d.). Breast cancer in men. Retrieved from https://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/breast/breast-cancer/breast-cancer-in-men/

Cochrane. (2018, October 5). Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Retrieved from https://www.cochrane.org/news/breast-cancer-awareness-month

Medical News Today. (2018, January 7). What you should know about breast cancer in teens. Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320533.php

MedLine Plus. (2018, May 22). Breast cancer. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/breastcancer.html

Stanford Children’s Health. (n.d.). How to perform a breast self-examination. Retrieved from https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=how-to-perform-a-breast-self-examination-bse-85-P00135